Best Cases For Epiphone Les Paul Guitars: 2021’s #1 Picks…

If you have an Epiphone Les Paul guitar, you should – no question about it – have a case to keep your beloved axe in good condition. And right now, these are the Best Cases For Epiphone Les Paul…


Best Cases For Epiphone Les Paul – Overview

CASEBest For…Price/Best Deal
Epiphone Case Les PaulBeginner, At-Home UseVIEW LATEST PRICES
Gibson Les Paul CaseAt-Home Use & TravelVIEW LATEST PRICES
Enki AMG-2 Guitar Double CaseTouring & International TravelVIEW LATEST PRICES
A Quick Overview of The Best Cases For The Epiphone Les Paul

How We Tested These Cases

In the past decade or so, I have played many, many gigs. I have also owned a bunch of different Epiphone Les Paul guitars, including a few Gibsons too.

And in that time, I’ve been through multiple Les Paul guitar cases. Big ones, little ones, and ones designed for touring.

Epiphone wilshire
Back In My Touring Days. And, Yes, That Is An Epiphone Wilshire!

I’ve had expensive ones, cheap ones, really expensive ones, and super-basic ones. This list includes all of them – from the best of the best to the basic options for players that only play at home.

Either way, if you own an Epiphone Les Paul, there’s a case for you listed below.

The Best Option – The Best Epiphone Les Paul Guitar Case

Epiphone Case Les Paul

If you’re running an Epiphone Les Paul, why not get a case that’s actually made by Epiphone? That’d make sense, right? Epiphone’s Les Paul case is custom designed specifically for its Les Paul guitars – all models.

If you want a snug fit, gorgeous build material, and secure machining and fastenings, this is the case to go for. I’ve had mine for almost a decade and it still looks and functions as good today as it did in 2011.

If you only own one guitar, and it is an Epiphone Les Paul, this is the case for you. It is affordable, made to exacting standings, and it is designed exactly to securely store and protect Epiphone Les Paul guitars.

If you’re on a budget but don’t want to scrimp on quality, the Epiphone Case Les Paul is the one to go for.

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The “I Only Play At Home” Option

Gibson Les Paul Case Brown

If you’re only playing guitar at home and you just need some place to store your axe, so it doesn’t get bumped or scuffed this brown leather case for the Les Paul is perfect. It looks amazing, totally unique really, and it will keep your beloved Les Paul free from any damage when you’re not using it.

And if you travel frequently and want to take your guitar with you, it will also do that too. In fact, this option is very similar to the Epiphone Case Les Paul only it is slightly more expensive because it is a Gibson-made one.

With respect to durability and protection, it is outstanding, so if you’re not on a particularly tight budget and want a really good-looking guitar case for your Les Paul, I really do not think you can go wrong with this brown number from Gibson.

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The Deluxe Option – The Best Option For Touring With / Storing Multiple Guitars

Enki AMG-2 Guitar Double Case

Did we save the best for last? Not really. This option is brilliant, but it is only really viable for those with more than one guitar. You see the Enki AMG-2 Guitar Double Case is designed for pro users, the guys and gals that play live or record often and need/want to carry two Les Pauls, or another style of guitar, with them.

The Enki AMG-2 Guitar Double Case will carry two guitars safely and securely, whether you’re on the road in your car or a van, or flying across the world on planes. If you have two guitars and you need to travel with them, the Enki AMG-2 Guitar Double Case is the cheapest and most secure way to do it.

I say, “cheap”, but this is a relative term. It is cheap because to buy two separate quality cases for your guitars would, arguably cost less, but it is still pretty expensive at $499 – although I do not think this case can be beaten when it comes to quality and protection. It is a beast.

> VIEW LATEST DEALS

Which Les Paul Guitar Case Should I Get?

As noted in the intro passage, and noted in the title for each section above, the best Les Paul case for your exact needs will depend entirely on what kind of player you are.

If you’re just playing at home and just need some to safely store your Epiphone Les Paul, the Epiphone Case Les Paul will be perfect – it is inexpensive and supremely well built.

And if you want something a little more premium, go with the Gibson Les Paul Case – it is slightly fancier than the Epiphone one but its usage-case is the same: it is great for at-home use and for travelling with your guitar.

Again, the build quality and level of protection you get is brilliant, so you have no issues in this context. A case like this – or the Epiphone one – will last you the rest of your life.

If you’re looking for a more professional case for your Les Paul, something that can move two guitars at once, then the Enki AMG-2 Guitar Double Case is the one to go for. It will carry both ST-style and T-style guitars, so if you have a Les Paul and an SG or a Strat, you’re good to go.

This option is more expensive, for obvious reasons, but, again, its quality is unparalleled at this price point. The Enki AMG-2 Guitar Double Case is designed for touring, professional players, so it will last you for the rest of your life and protect your guitars while you fly around the world for shows.

It is also a great option for domestic touring as well; it is easy to carry and move and, when fully loaded, it hardly takes up any room in the back of a van. I know this because I used the Enki AMG-2 Guitar Double Case for around two years back when bands used to be able to tour – it is a killer case.

Christoper Horton

Christopher started playing guitar in 1994 at 14 years old. He has been a part of the Metal community for the last 25 years and has 11 solo albums under his belt. Christopher started his career in Atlanta, Georgia in the late 90's, later securing a major label record deal in the early 2000s under the name IAMSOUND. He worked briefly as a hired gun in Los Angeles before he opened his own studio in 2010 in Savannah, Georgia. Chris has worked with some big names over the years like Tripping Daisy, Kylesa, Baroness, and the legendary Reflux.

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