Can You Use Fender Mustang Micro With A Bass?

The Fender Mustang Micro is a great little tool for playing anywhere. But can the Fender Mustang Micro be used with a bass?


If you caught our launch post on the Fender Mustang Micro, you’ll know we were pretty excited about this awesome little gizmo. Taking Fender’s already-awesome Mustang GTX amp profiles, the Mustang Micro has additional effects and even an EQ setting.

Fender-Mustang-Micro

For practice, for recording down ideas, and for basically everything else you can think of, the Fender Mustang Micro is a must-have piece of kit. I’d go as far as saying that if you’re brand new to guitar, get the Mustang Micro instead of a practice amp.

It’s a hell of a lot cheaper and it will sound way better, thanks to Fender’s Mustang GTX amp profiles.

Can You Use Fender Mustang Micro With Bass?

The Fender Mustang Micro is designed for use with an electric guitar. But that doesn’t mean you cannot use it with a bass. Your bass guitar has a jack input just like your guitar, so, yes, of course, the Fender Mustang Micro can be used with a bass.

You’ll have access to the same 12 amps and effects as you do when using the Fender Mustang Micro with a guitar, as well as all of the effects.

RELATED: The Best Free Guitar Amp Simulators For Metal & Rock Music

A bass guitar is a very different animal to the electric guitar, however, so things that’ll work great when using the Fender Mustang Micro on a guitar might not work too well on a bass.

But because the Fender Mustang Micro has a built-in EQ, you can augment the output to take into account more of your bass’ low-end, and this makes the Fender Mustang Micro an ideal choice for practicing.

Why I Immediately Bought The Fender Mustang Micro

As noted in our Fender Mustang Micro launch guide, the micro amp is small enough to fit in your pocket, it is powered by Fender’s Mustang GTX technology, so you get access to 12 amp sims, and it has physical buttons for altering the tone and settings of each amp.

Everything is done on the actual unit too; so there’s no requirement to have a certain phone or app. For me, this is a really big plus. As much as I love the Spark amp, I do find having to use my phone to run it kind of annoying.

Can You Use Fender Mustang Micro With A Bass?

And unlike the Spark Amp, the Fender Mustang Micro is designed to be completely portable. I mean, the entire unit will sit squarely in the palm of your hand, so you can literally take it anywhere and everywhere, making playing your electric guitar (or bass) on the beach a real possibility.

Hell, you could even climb a mountain and start ripping out some David Gilmore-style solos at its peak, watching the sun go down. I was so impressed by the initial previews of the Fender Mustang Micro that I immediately bought one.

My Fender Mustang Micro should be arriving later this week, so look out for my full review soon.

Is The Fender Mustang Micro Worth It?

It doesn’t matter whether you’re a seasoned pro or just starting out, the Fender Mustang Micro is an essential piece of kit for upping your practice and playing time. Because of its size, you can take it with you everywhere you go which means you’ll be playing more – and have less excuses to avoid playing.

You can also use it as a USB Audio Interface as well, meaning you can connect your guitar to your MacBook or PC.

It works with headphones – both wired and wireless – so it is completely silent; you can sit in your living room with your family and play. They’ll hear the strings, but you’ll hear a full on Fender Mustang GTX amp profile via your headphones, complete with fully customisable effects and an EQ.

Fender-Mustang-Micro-2

And let’s be frank about amps, if you want to buy one – even a small practice one – you’ll have to drop quite a bit of money on one in order to get a decent sound. With the Fender Mustang Micro, you’ll pay less than $90/£90 and get access to Fender’s incredible Mustang GTX amp profiles which sound truly amazing.

You don’t even need to worry about batteries or wires, as the Fender Mustang Micro is completely wireless – it runs on a non-removable battery that’ll give your around four hours of solid playing time before a recharge is required.

Interested? Check out the full details on Fender’s official site.


Recommended Gear

The latest and best gear we recommend right now…

Spark Amp – The amp itself is brilliant, coming with a bunch of great tones and plenty of power with its 50W speaker. But the real magic happens when it is paired with your phone, opening up access to thousands of effects and tones that you can customize to your exact specifications. And best of all? It’s not even that expensive either.

BIAS FX 2 – If you want to run your guitar through your PC or Mac, BIAS FX 2 is one of the best ways to develop and create amazing-sounding tones. BIAS FX is an amp and effects simulator and it is one of the best in the business. Inexpensive and perfect for jamming and recording, BIAS FX 2 is one of my favorite amp sims for Mac and PC.

Fender Mustang Micro – The Fender Mustang Micro is a small gizmo that plugs directly into your guitar’s jack. You then plug in some headphones and can switch between 12 of Fender’s Mustang amp, complete with effects and modification options. It doesn’t have any wires, it will fit in your pocket, and it even doubles as a USB audio interface too. It is one of the coolest things I’ve tested all year.

Fender Play – Learning guitar can be hard. It takes forever, seemingly, and progress is slow. But if you take a focussed approach with learning the basics and even more advanced stuff, you’ll develop much quicker. That’s why we love Fender Play; it has over 3,000 lessons and everything a beginner player needs. You can also get a free trial right now too – so you have literally nothing to lose!

Richard

Richard has been playing guitar for over a decade and is a huge fan of metal, doom, sludge, and rock music in general – though mostly metal. Having played in bands and worked in studios since the early 2000s, Richard is a massive music production geek, a fan of minimalist recording techniques, and he really likes old-school guitars.

Recent Posts