What is An FRFR Speaker Cabinet? A Pros & CONS Guide

In this guide, we’ll cover off what an FRFR speaker cabinet is, how they work, how they compare to standard cabs, and the pros and cons of using them in the studio, in a live setting, and at home…


The sheer level of technology guitarists have at their disposal these days is mind-boggling. It is easier than ever to create tones, input and record/play through your laptop or PC, or dial in amazing sounds from tiny accessories like the Fender Mustang Micro when you’re practising at home. Basically, it is a great time to be picking up the guitar.

The rise of modelling amps, things like the Fractal Axe-Fx, the Line 6 Helix, or the German-built Kemper profiling amps, both in the studio and in live situations called for a new type of cabinet, a cabinet designed specifically with these digital modelling amps in mind. This is why FRFR speaker cabinets are becoming more and more popular.

What Does FRFR Mean?

FRFR stands for “full range, flat response”, so an FRFR speaker cab is a “full range, flat response speaker cabinet”. These types of cabs – which are available everywhere these days – can and will handle any kind of tone or frequency you choose to run through them.

The idea is simple: create a blank canvass, free from the type of nuances you get with traditional guitar cabs, so that the “tone” of the amp modeller comes through unimpeded. Why do this? Simple: because a modelling amp like the Helix Line 6, for instance, already generates a “speaker tone” as part of its sound profiling.

what is an frfr speaker

Because the tone you create with your modelling amp is designed to be complete, it includes ALL the elements you’ll need, things like microphone placement and cabinet type, you no longer require a specific type of guitar cab to create a sound – it is ALL done via the amp modeller and then pushed through an FRFR speaker cab.

This is why FRFR speaker cabs are designed to sound completely neutral; the amp modeller creates 100% of the sound and the FRFR speaker cab is there to simply relay that sound to a crowd or your bandmates with as much fidelity to the original signal as possible.

This is why guitarists that use modelling amps tend to use FRFR speaker cabinets – or plug directly into the PA during live performances a la Meshuggah.

FRFR Speaker vs Guitar Cab

Some things are sacred. The sound of an Orange cab, for instance, or a Marshall 4×12 cabinet, for instance. These guitar cabs have been used for decades. Black Sabbath wouldn’t sound like Black Sabbath without its specific guitar cabs. Ditto AC/DC, SLEEP, and Metallica.

While FRFR speakers are used in live settings, there are “issues” with these types of speakers, especially if you’re going for a “blow the roof off” kind of sound. As the name suggests, FRFR speakers have a flat resonance, they do not push and move the air like a traditional cab.

If you do use a modelling amp with a traditional cab, you will need to make sure that it has a built-in amp, otherwise, it simply will not work. The Kemper does not have a built-in amp, for instance, while Positive Grid’s BIAS comes in a 600W powered version for this exact reason – so you can use it to play live via cabs.

This is why many metal bands that use modelling amps still run them through a stack of traditional guitar cabs. They want that organic sound, that nuance you get from a Marshall, or an Orange, or a Peavey. And that’s totally cool; metal and rock is all about tone, so you gotta do what it takes to dial it in.

Using FRFR Speaker In Live Settings

The upshot of using modern FRFR speakers in a live setting is that you can rock up to a venue and get your guitar setup in seconds. You don’t need to worry about microphones, the layout of the stage, or making sure all your knobs are in the right place. You plug the modelling amp into your FRFR speaker and attach your pedalboard switcher. And you’re done.

This is why bands like Judas Priest, Deftones, Trivium, Meshuggah and Periphery use modelling amps and FRFR speakers when they play live. They use them because it lets their guitar techs easily dial in a studio-perfect sound within moments.

Nothing ever changes with a modelling amp and an FRFR speaker, as the settings are all digitally stored on the modelling amp, and the FRFR speaker is designed to be neutral. All you have to do is switch the FRFR speaker on and remember where all your different tones are located on the pedalboard switcher.

The Subtle Art of Guitar Cabinet Microphone Placement

There is a certain magic about guitar cabs, especially in the studio and when playing live, when microphone placement comes into play. The combinations for tone and sound are infinite; you can change the amp head, add in pedals, move the microphones, alter the EQ – the possibilities are endless. All of this affects the sound, creating different sonic profiles and tones.

Can you do this with an FRFR speaker? Not really, no – everything is digital with an FRFR speaker. For some players, this is part of the appeal. You no longer need to invest in thousands of dollars worth of hardware. For other players, the idea of using an FRFR speaker is heresy. Like, I could never imagine Matt Pike using modelling amps and an FRFR speaker for SLEEP – it just wouldn’t sound/look right.

Matt-Pike

Certain sounds, big, nasty, organic sounds of the type you associate with bands like Boris, SLEEP, and Electric Wizard demand specific types of cabinets, amp heads, and pedals. This combination of elements, always specific to the player, is what makes the bands’ tone so unique and compelling. It is just as important as the lyrics or the riffs.

I’ve been using Orange for kinda a long time actually. I was watching Black Sabbath on MTV when I was a kid and I was like Orange, Orange, Orange. After that, we started buying Oranges up when we first, kind of, started the band. That’s kind of the tone I was going for – you know, in the beginner like a classic, rock, overdrive. Now I’m just using massive mountains of Orange.

Matt Pike on Orange Blog

Powered or Non-Powered FRFR Speakers

If you’re using a modelling amp, something like the Helix Line 6, and you want to start using it live rather the lugging ALL your gear around with you, an FRFR speaker is something you will need to invest in. But you first need to know whether you require an active and passive (powered or non-powered) FRFR speaker.

As we noted earlier, the Kemper modelling amps are not powered, so to use this in a live setting with an FRFR speaker, you’d want a powered FRFR speaker. Similarly, if the amp modeller you’re using has a built-in amp, you can use a non-powered FRFR speaker – or run it through a traditional guitar cabinet, if you want a more natural, air-moving sound.

Now that’s out of the way, let’s take a look at some of the coolest, new FRFR speakers you can buy right now.

What’s The Best FRFR Speaker?

When it comes to playing live and practising with an FRFR speaker, you need one thing from the speaker: power – and plenty of it. If you plan on using an FRFR speaker in live settings, you’ll want plenty of volume. And right now, these FRFR speakers are some of the top-rated on the market for sheer volume and power.

3. The Cheapest FRFR Option – Headrush FRFR-112 

The Headrush FRFR-112 is the cheapest and one of the loudest FRFR speakers currently available on the market.

It lacks some of the technical features you get on the Powercab 112 Plus and the Kemper Kabinet but for sheer grunt, volume, and value for money, the Headrush FRFR-112 is a great option for those on a budget that want to fill a room or a venue.


2. An FRFR Designed For Line 6 Users – Line6 Powercab 112 Plus

The Line6 Powercab 112 Plus comes with a raft of technology packed inside it. You have 128 presets, IR loading, MIDI In/Out, AES/EBU I/O, L6 LINK, and a USB audio interface. On top of that, the speaker uses a single 12in custom hybrid coaxial speaker that is hidden away inside the speaker’s modern-looking chassis.

Best For Overall Features & Capabilities
Line 6 Powercab 112 Plus
$799

The Powercab 112 Plus by Line6 is perhaps the best overall option on this list. But it is expensive. For the extra money, however, you get a ton of functionality, one of the meatiest sounds around, and built-in support for 128 presets, IR loading, MIDI In/Out, AES/EBU I/O, L6 LINK, and a USB audio interface. This thing is incredible. 

The Line6 Powercab 112 Plus is not cheap but it does pack in a metric ton of features and capabilities, making it a great choice for your home studio, practice sessions, and even recording. It is also PLENTY loud too, so if you’re concerned about volume when using FRFR speakers, with this one you needn’t be.


1. The Perfect FRFR Speaker For Kemper Profiler – Kemper Kabinet

Did we save the best for last? Kinda, yeah! The Kemper Kabinet is infinitely more affordable than the Line6 Powercab 112 Plus at just $480. And this thing is no slouch either. This FRFR speaker runs a 12in Celestion speaker that comes with 19 different “imprints” that help dial in distinct, unique, and custom tones.

The Celestion-Powered FRFR Speaker
Kemper Kabinet
$480

Powered by a custom 12in Celestion speaker, the Kemper Kabinet is the perfect FRFR speaker for PROFILER players. It comes with 19 imprints – custom speaker tones – and 2000w of power. For the price, this is about as good as it gets. Amazing stuff, as usual, from Kemper. 

What imprints does the Kemper Kabinet have? You have built-in speaker characters for Celestion, JBL, and classic Jensen speakers to name just a few. The Kemper Kabinet, as you’d expect, is designed for use with Kemper’s Profiler and, like the Headrush FRFR-112, it has 2000W of power under the hood, making it ideal for playing live and practising with a full band.


What FRFR Speaker Should I Buy?

Which is the best FRFR speaker? It depends on what you want to do with it; the Headrush FRFR-112 comes with 2000W of power which is more than enough to fill any style of venue – it is also really affordable too. And if that’s not enough for your needs, you can pair it with another one, creating a daisy chain on massively powerful FRFR speakers that’ll blow the roof off any venue.

Similarly, if you want or need access to a myriad of tech and settings options, the Line 6 Powercab 112 Plus and Kemper Kabinet are two of the most feature-rich FRFR speakers on the market; although for value for money, the Kemper Kabinet which costs less than $500 is the best option for PROFILER users.

Personally, I’d go with the Line 6 Powercab 112 Plus simply because of the array of features and capabilities it has. I also use the Line 6 Helix, so, for me, it is a natural choice. These are just my personal picks, however, there are many, many more options available on the market – and the range in price and power varies massively, as you can see here.

Richard

Richard has been playing guitar for over a decade and is a huge fan of metal, doom, sludge, and rock music in general – though mostly metal. Having played in bands and worked in studios since the early 2000s, Richard is a massive music production geek, a fan of minimalist recording techniques, and he really likes old-school guitars.

Recent Posts

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share this post with your friends!